Romeo and Juliet

‘Capulet shows himself to be a concerned and caring parent throughout the play.’ Examine his role with particular reference to act 3 scene 5 and show whether or not you agree.I have been asked to prove whether Lord Capulet is a caring parent or not throughout the play. I believe that he is a caring father for Juliet, he has said and done things throughout the play to prove this to us, I will talk about this later on during the coursework. Meanwhile let us firstly talk about the general period and background which this play took place in.The story of Romeo and Juliet took place in the Elizabethan period. Women’s lives where very difficult during those periods, this is because the men had almost full control over them. The only option for a woman to control her life was suicide. They had no voice in society and did not have money earning jobs, whilst divorce was not an open option for them. They where not given access to education. Men had almost full control over them. This proves to us that a women had no say and whoever her father or brother or male family member told her marry they would have no choice but to marry the chosen man.Women did not have the right to answer back or refuse to get married, and if they did they would have been punished severely for it. Therefore women did not answer back or refuse and did what they where told by their male family members.We can clearly see that these conditions where very harsh for the women at those times, and I am totally against this behaviour and society where women are treated this way I think it is totally unfair for the women because I believe they should choose whom to marry.At the beginning of the play Paris asks Lord Capulet for Juliet’s hand in marriage but lord Capulet declines, taking into consideration that Lord Capulet wants Paris to marry Juliet at the same time he wants the best for Juliet.These are the first indications of the love that Lord Capulet has for his daughter Juliet. We know this when lord Capulet quotes ‘My child is yet a stranger in this world’ here he proves to us that she is still young and he cares for her happiness and doesn’t want her to get married this early in her life, he gives Paris a certain date ‘Let two more summers whither in her pride’ he believes that in two more summers she will be old and mature enough to be a wife. These quotes show us the characteristics of a caring Parent that cares about his child. “But woo her gentle Paris, get her heart.” This proves that Capulet cares about Juliet, he wants her to love Paris.The Lord also believes that if Juliet is to marry Paris at this early stage of her life it may spoil her ‘And too soon marred are those so early made.’ He may know this because of his wife Lady Capulet, who was forced to marry him at a young age. This proves to us that he cares about Juliet he wants what is most suitable and best for her, which is something you would expect from a loving and caring parent. He doesn’t want her to end up being like her mother, being forced to marriage in an early stage of her life.He also quotes ‘Earth has swallowed all my hopes but she’ which is another indication of the love Lord Capulet has for her, it also proves that she is his only daughter where he may had children in the past that have passed away and ‘earth has swallowed’ which means they are dead in their coffins underground or in their tombs etc.He also mentions to Paris that Juliet means everything to him’She is the hopeful lady of my earth.’ He indicates to us here that Juliet is his future and is all his wealth; she means the world to him, which is another indication of the love he has towards her.After the death of Tybalt, Lord Capulet seemed to have changed his mind about how soon the marriage should take place. This change of heart was due to the fact that he saw his daughter grieving and thought that she was miserable over her cousin’s death when in actual fact she was unhappy because she thought she would never see Romeo again. Lord Capulet thought that the best thing to do to get her out of her misery was to marry her to Paris as soon as possible ‘O’ Thursday let it be. O’ Thursday’. We can clearly see that Lord Capulet is very unhappy because of Tybalt’s death. He also thought that Juliet loved Tybalt, which is indicated to us when he quotes ‘she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly’. Juliet does like Tybalt, but she cares mostly about the fact that she may never see Romeo again.Old Capulet thinks of Paris as a gentle, rich, respectful, young and handsome man. He believes that he would make a very good husband to Juliet, ‘She shall be married to this Noble earl’ this quotation proves to us that he does like Paris by calling him a ‘Noble earl’.Lady Capulet is looking forward to the marriage as when she explains it to Juliet she refers to the marriage as a ‘day of joy’ which indicates that she is looking forward to it. Lady Capulet does agree to the marriage because she also thinks that Juliet is weeping over her cousin’s death, and the marriage would make Juliet happy. Lady Capulet has no option but to support the views of her husband as she was possibly even forced to marrying him in the first place, we have discussed the options women had in those times which where very few. Bearing in mind Lady Capulet has been brought up in a patriarchal society she will never speak her mind even if she wanted do. We have come to realise that she is an uncaring parent when Juliet asks her mother to delay the marriage she replies ‘Here comes your father. Tell him so yourself’, a caring mother would have helped her daughter out in a situation such as this but Lady Capulet decided not to, which leads to the idea of her being an uncaring mother.When Capulet approaches Juliet in order to inform her about her wedding, he begins to talk to her about the tears in her face ‘What still in tears?’ the use of the rhetorical question is vital he indicates to us that he cares for her.As soon as he finds out she is not interested in marrying Paris he becomes furious. ‘How, now! How, now!’ these are some of the words he used to describe he’s aggravation. He reacted in this manner because he is the Lord of the Capulet house and does not expect to be answered back by anybody thus Juliet answering him back results in him being extremely furious. He has also mentioned to Paris’I think she will be ruled in all respects by me’ hence her declining to marry Paris will put Lord Capulet in a foolish and embarrassing situation with Paris. Capulet also threatens that she will not inherit any of his wealth, “Nor what is mine shall never do thee good.”Juliet feels absolutely shattered after hearing that her father has arranged her marriage to Paris to take place on Thursday, this gives a sense of dramatic irony, as us the audience know that she is married to Romeo whilst all her family do not know, and have arranged a marriage to take place on the following Thursday.Capulet’s anger is highlighted by the different words he uses to curse Juliet, ‘Out, you green-sickness carrion! Out, you baggage! You tallow-face!’ these curses prove to us that Capulet is very angry as he mentions Juliet to be as ‘pale as corpse’ and a ‘face as white as candle-wax’.Capulet believes that Paris will make a perfect husband for Juliet by quoting ‘And having now provided, a gentleman of noble parentage’ this indicates that he has done a good job to provide Juliet with a good husband. Lord Capulet threatens to kick Juliet out of the house if she does not do what she is ordered to do by her father ‘get thee to church o’ Thursday or never after look me in the face’. As we mentioned earlier in the coursework the play was set during the Elizabethan period, her father has warned her offering her the option to be at the church on Thursday or suffer the consequence of kicked out of the house.Juliet is absolutely shocked; she can’t do what her father tells her because she is already married to Romeo, a marriage that her father nor her mother know about.When Juliet returns to her father after visiting the Friar, there are indications that prove to us that he still likes her after the huge argument he has with her about the marriage by asking her ‘Where have you been gadding?’. This quote indicates that his personality has completely changed towards Juliet; we can now see him as a happy and excited man. ‘I have learnt me to repent the sin’ her visiting the Friar has made Lord Capulet think that she is repentant and is now a happy man knowing that Juliet is sorry and wants to marry Paris. ‘I met the youthful lord at the Friars cell, and gave him what becomed love I might.’ She wants to prove to her father that she likes Paris and would not mind marrying him. Him replying ‘why, I am glad on’t’ proves he is now a happy man.In my opinion the biggest indication that proves Capulet loves his daughter Juliet, is when she seems dead to him. He uses quotes such as ‘Death lies on her like an untimely frost, upon the sweetest flower of all the field’ here he compares Juliet to a flower that has been killed by the frost, ‘Ready to go, but never to return’ the use of personification here explains the sorrow lord Capulet is going through, this sorrow proves the love he has for his only daughter that has just passed away.At the start of the play it is clear that Capulet loves Juliet, and Juliet loves him just as much. There are many quotes throughout the play that prove this point ‘She is the hopeful lady of my earth’ this quote proves that he cherishes and cares about her a lot.He shows he is concerned for her and cares for her when he asks her ‘where have you been gadding?’Capulet arranged the marriage with Paris to take place because he thought it was best for his daughter, because he thought she was going through a difficult stage in her life where he assumed she was grieving over the death of her cousin Tybalt, where in actual fact she was unhappy because she thought she will never see Romeo again.After reading and understanding the play I strongly believe that Capulet does show himself to be a concerned and caring parent throughout the play.

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The unbreakable love story, which only lasted five precious days. Those five days united two enemies after years. That special love which is still remembered till today. The story in which two lovers paid their life to unite two families. This is the story of Romero and Juliet.”Romeo and Juliet” is a romantic story with a sprinkle of comedy that ends with a tragedy which takes the lives of these two love birds.Mercutio is the only character, who brings action and comedy into this play. He makes the audience laugh with his comic humor and transforms the gloomy, grieved scenes into action and fights. He makes this play turn to a new twist. Mercutio entertains the audience, but as well as the other characters in this romantic love story.In act 1 scene 4, Romeo is very miserable and sick at heart. He is very much in love with Rosaline, but she doesn’t love him back. Romeo’s best friend Mercutio tries to change his mood into better. Mercutio says: “Nay gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.”In this line Mercutio tells Romeo, who is heartbroken, to cheer up and forget about Rosaline. Mercutio is very heartless and doesn’t care about love. He always is joking and messing round. In line 27-28 Mercutio says: “If love be rough with you, be rough with love. Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down.”This suggests that Mercutio is careless about the feelings of love. He doesn’t believe in love and has negative feelings about it. He believes that no one should fall that deep in love that they get trapped and are unable to get out of it. Love is like quick sand, where you fall deeper and deeper. “Borrow Cupid’s wings and soar with them above a common bound.”This shows us the feelings of Mercutio towards love. He only cares about sex; he doesn’t want himself or his cousin Romeo to be in love with anyone. In his point of view love should be like a lotus pond on a dirty ditch. Like the flower never gets dirty even though it lives on a dirty pond, the same you should be with someone but never love them.The first impression of Mercutio on the audience is that he is against the relationship of love. His only thought goes towards sex, sex and only sex. He only cares about sex. Mercutio is a player, who doesn’t want to have kids; his only intentions are to have fun and enjoy his life to a full potential.Act 2 scene 1, occurs just after the Capulet’s party. Before this scene Romeo and Juliet have met each other and fallen in love. After the party Romeo leaves to the Capulet’s house looking for Juliet, but Mercutio thinks that Romeo has gone back to meet Rosaline and to spend a night with her.In line 19 Mercutio says: “Rosaline’s bright eyes, by her high forehead and her scarlet lip, by her fine foot, straight leg and quivering thigh.”In this quotation Mercutio describes Rosaline in a sexual way. He is very rude to and about women. Mercutio is only interested in how women look and not how they feel. This again suggests that Mercutio is only bothered to have sex and not feeling their emotions or reacting their to heart feelings.This shows us that in Shakespeare’s time women weren’t given much value and were only considered in the matter of sex. Women weren’t appreciated and were treated very unpleasantly. Men only used women to have sex and to enjoy themselves. They didn’t believe in the actuality of love and marriage or equal partnership. Women weren’t given the power to speak against the men or to say their likes and dislikes. As we can see in Act 2 scene 1, when Mercutio describes Rosaline in a very sexual way. This also establishes the fact that in Shakespeare’s time women were treated in sexual ways. Additionally this suggests that women weren’t given the full fairness and equality in that time.Mercutio serves an important purpose for a modern day audience. He makes the audience think about the way women were treated in the past. Also it tells the audience that love isn’t an excellent feeling, beyond love is sex. Sex is everything for Mercutio; he believes that a man should have sex as many times as possible in his life. In the contemporary times the audience would laugh with him and give support to him and his ideas. However the modern audience would react to this completely different. They would be shocked and surprised at the character of Mercutio.In the past times men were given the power and that’s would have thought that Mercutio was a normal character. All the men believed and had same opinions about love and sex. But the modern audience has totally uncommon considered opinions on love and sex. The modern audience thinks that he is being discourteous, disrespectful and very impolite.In act 2 scene 4, Mercutio believes that Romeo has stayed out all night because of his love, his sickness for Rosaline. He doesn’t know that he is now in love with Juliet. Benvolio says that Tybalt has written a letter challenging Romeo to a duel.When Benvolio tells Mercutio about the duel, Mercutio thinks that Romeo wouldn’t be so up for the fight. However Benvolio thinks that Romeo will be up for the challenge.Mercutio says: “Alas poor Romeo he is already dead; stabbed with a white wench’s black eye; shot through the ear with a love-song;”Here, Mercutio is suggesting that because Romeo is in love with Rosaline, he is very weak, fragile and feeble to be able to fight Tybalt. He thinks that Romeo’s love has made him weak and scrawny. He believes that love has killed Romeo; he is no longer the man he was before. He is stating that love makes a man weak, and changes him a lot. Here he again is going against love.In line 21 Mercutio says these lines about Tybalt: “He fights as you sing prick-song, keeps time, distance, and proportion;”Mercutio is stating that Tybalt is a precise fighter and a precise lover. He is trying to say that Tybalt is not spontaneous; he is not a brawler.”The pox of such antic, lisping, affecting fantasticoes;”Mercutio is questioning Tybalt’s sexuality, he is saying that he isn’t sure if he is gay or not.When Romeo says:”A man may strain courtesy?”Mercutio then replies to him by saying: “That’s as much as to say, such a case as yours constrains a man to bow in the hams.”In this quotation, Mercutio is making bawdy jokes about sex and having sex. he is saying that Romeo has fun last night.In line 63 Mercutio says:”Follow me this jest now, till thou has warn out thy pump, that when the single sole of it is worn, the jest may remain after the wearing sole singular.Here, Mercutio is again making jokes about having sex, he is saying that you must have enjoyed having sex.In line 80 Mercutio says: “Thy wit is a very bitter sweeting, it is a most sharp sauce.”Here Mercutio is taking out the mickey of Romeo. He is saying that you are very quick witted.”Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo; now art thou what thou art.”Romeo is back and is saying the things that he used to say about love. Mercutio is very pleased and delighted to hear that Romeo is back to his normal self.Mercutio is insulting the nurse by saying: “To hide her face; for her fan’s the fairer face.”Mercutio is very much being rude to the nurse and is saying that her vagina us better looking than her face. He is abusing the nurse and being very impolite.Mercutio says: “The dial is now upon the prick of noon.”He is making reference to a part of his body and again is being extremely rude.In Act 3 scene 1, this is the last time we see and hear from Mercutio in this play. “I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire: the day is hot, the Capulet’s abroad. And, if we meet, we shall not escape a brawl”In this quotation Benvolio begs Mercutio to go home. Benvolio is worried, that if they meet the Capulet’s, there will definitely be a fight between them. Benvolio is scared that something will go wrong if Mercutio stays here and they Capulet’s arrive. Mercutio evades the question and accuses Benvolio of being hot tempered by saying: “Thou art like one of those fellows that when he enters the confines of a tavern claps me his sword upon the table and says” god send me no need of thee!” and by the operation of the second cup draws it on the drawer, when indeed there is no need.”In line 11 Mercutio once again blame that Benvolio is the one who has a burning temper. “Thou art as hot a Jack in thy mood as any in Italy.”This shows that instead of being quiet and accepting that he is the one who has the hottest temper; he accuses Benvolio of having the worst temper between them two.In line 21 Mercutio yet again accuses Benvolio of having a bad temper.”Thou wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes: what eye but such an eye would spy out such a quarrel? Thy head is as fun of quarrels as an egg is full of meat, and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an egg for quarrelling: thou hast quarreled with a man for coughing in the streets.”This once more suggests that Mercutio accuses Benvolio to be the one with a hot temper, instead of confessing that he himself consists of a boiling temper and mostly isn’t able to control himself in situations like fights.When in this scene Tybalt arrives searching for Romeo, Mercutio says to Tybalt in line 40: “but one word with one of us? Couple it with something; make it a word and a blow.”This suggests that Mercutio mocks Tybalt. He says: “just one word, why not make it a word or a blow. This shows that he challenges Tybalt to either have a man fight or oral sex. By saying the word “blow”, he gives Tybalt two options. He can either have a punch, meaning he can fight with him, or he can suck his…. In this scene Mercutio is being very rude to Tybalt and is accusing his sexuality. He trying to say that Tybalt hasn’t got the strength to fight with him and also that Tybalt is gay.When Romeo arrives to the scene, Tybalt challenges Romeo for a fight; Romeo refuses, because he knows that Tybalt is now a part of his family. This is because before this scene Romeo and Juliet have married and as Tybalt is juliet’s cousin, therefore he and Tybalt are now related. As Mercutio hears that Romeo has denied the offer of the fight he announces: “o calm, dishonorable, vile submission!”Mercutio is traumatized, appalled, devastated and is tremor to hear that Romeo, his brave and strong cousin won’t fight and Mercutio thinks that Romeo is a coward; he is a gutless sneak, who refused to fight. He thinks that Romeo is scared of Tybalt.”Will you pluck your sword out of his pilcher by the ears?”After Mercutio thinks that Romeo has backed off because he is scared, he then challenges Tybalt to have a fight. He asks him that are you going to draw your sword quickly, or shall I stab you first?This suggests that Mercutio really is keen to have a fight. Mercutio is the only and only character in the whole play that starts and brings all the actions. He is the only one who is brave enough to have an argument in this play.Romeo is holding Mercutio and is stopping him from fighting; right at that time Tybalt attacks Mercutio and stabs him under Romeo’s arms. After Mercutio got stabbed he says: “I am hurt. A plague o’ both your houses! I am sped.”Mercutio curses both houses, the Montague’s and the Capulet’s.In Mercutio’s last few lines he states that: “Ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man.”In his last lines he sounds very serious. His character through out the whole play is a funny and a comic character, but towards the end of his character he gets quite serious. He knows that his death is knocking on his door. The adjective “grave” suggests his seriousness bursting out of him. Even though he is still being funny and trying to amuse the other characters; he is also trying to not let anyone realize that he has been stabbed and hurt badly. And that he is nearing his death.Mercutio plays an important role in this play. Without him there would be no comedy, no action, no fights or deaths and also no one would be rude to anyone. His personality is the most worthy personality in the play. He had to be in this play, if he wouldn’t be in this play then this play wouldn’t be the exact as it is now.Shakespeare has thought very much before creating him. He knew how the audience in that time would react to Mercutio’s character. He knew that without him this play wouldn’t be a tragedy. He is the only character who dies in this play. Without him there wouldn’t be anyone who makes joke, the audience in Shakespeare’s time wouldn’t want to see this play otherwise.In Shakespeare’s time the audience would have laughed at what Mercutio says in the play, they thought that his character is like a normal, ordinary human being. They thought that men should be like him, Mercutio would be the ideal man.However the modern audience wouldn’t think that he is funny at all. They would think that Mercutio is extremely rude and impolite in this play. That is because the views and opinions on love and sex have clearly changed from the past to now. Now people respect women and don’t criticizes them in any way. Especial they don’t describe women in sexual ways, and also think that women should be given much more respect than they were given in the past.I personally would think that Mercutio is a humorous character, but only if I was living in Shakespeare’s time. Now I think that he is very rude about women and all he wants is sex all his life. He thinks that sex is the only aim of a man that every man has to achieve.Without Mercutio this romantic love story of Romeo and Juliet wouldn’t end in this way and wouldn’t be called a tragedy.

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Explore the ways Shakespeare portrays the ambiguity of Juliet’s character her insubordination to, and relationship with her parents.William Shakespeare’s tragic play, Romeo and Juliet, is a story of hatred wounds reopened through the love of between rival families, where only death will bring a finale. This story of these town teenagers is set in the 1500s, obviously the culture and general behaviour was very different, and this has a significant effect on the way the story is acted out by the characters.Today, we expect children and teenagers to debate arguments, make decisions for themselves, and be rebellious to their parents and authority in general. But, in the 1500s this was far from normal behaviour. The parents in traditional rich families would control the children in their everyday activities – although the sons were controlled to a lesser extent. Children and daughters especially, would be treated like objects. Children were just obedient, there was no real culture urged to rebel, argue or disobey with their parents. Marriages in these families would also be initiated by the parents, mainly for the daughters though. In fact Juliet in the play is from a very early scene, arranged to marry Paris with Juliet herself, having very little say. This arrangement was done in cases that would often secure a good life for the daughter. Marrying an accomplished and wealthy man would make life a lot better for the daughter.The subject of love in plays previous to Romeo and Juliet had nearly always been based around comedy. Never before had this subject of love been seen as serious or tragic. Therefore, the creating of this new way to look at love’s emotions was a dramatic device in itself. Audiences of the play in the 1500s would have been shocked at the last scenes of Romeo and Juliet in the chapel.If we look at the aspect of the play that shows the parent and child relationships, we can see hints of this play coming through into modern age. The parent/child relationships – especially those between Juliet and her parents – are very much anticipated of today’s teenagers.”Deny thy father and refuse thy name””Romeo is banished – to speak that word is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo and Juliet, all slain, all dead”.This first quote has Juliet questioning herself, and her decisions. She loves Romeo, she even quotes that to have Romeo banished is as if slaying her whole family. This uncontrollable love for Romeo promotes her realisation that she must pursue, and “deny thy father” – and his wish to marry Paris, as well as hating the Montagues.”For then I hope thou wilt not keep him long, but send him back”Juliet expressing her will to see Romeo, although her family are all teething at him for the murder of Tybalt, showing the single mind that she has. With this single mind comes a strong character in Juliet. In the 1500s it would have taken someone very courageous to stand up to their parents like Juliet does; even risking a beating, she stays to her word, and love, for Romeo.”Speak not, reply not, do not answer me! My fingers itch.”To a contemporary audience, this treatment of Juliet, by her father, may seem power hungry and unfair. But, in the Shakespearian times an audience viewing this play would have likely been more shocked by Juliet’s behaviour herself. Children were never seen to have any disobedience to parents. They were seen to grow full of self pride and respect; this was then broken down by the parents and older family so the children would grow up ‘properly’. The fact that a daughter is being this disrespectful, and because it is all for love would have furthered the confused and disrespectful emotions for Juliet from the audience.Feuding, a major theme in: Romeo and Juliet. The obvious examples of this is between the Motagues and Capulets, and between parents and child. But this feuding in the play is fuelled by love. And love in this play can be seen in its three guises. The early attempts from Capulet and his wife to arrange the marriage, between Paris and Juliet, are for a main reason of financial security. This being one of the guises it is well represented.The physical lust between two people depicted by Romeo and Juliet’s almost immediate kissing on their first meet.”Let lips do what hands do”Showing that lust is passionate and uncontrollable, and very much alive between two people.Romance is the third recognised form of love and is obviously seen throughout any scene involving Romeo and Juliet. One key example is when Romeo has just left the party. He dares to venture back into Capulet’s land, just to see Juliet.”Can I go forward when my heart is here? Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out?”This way of displaying love has the effect of creating a good image for Romeo in the audience’s head. This sets them up for when he is later banished, and eventually commits suicide. So the shock is greater.Part of the reason why an audience of Shakespearian generation would have been shocked by Juliet’s character is the way her character was moulded before she actually appeared on stage. From act one scene two, Capulet is talking to Paris about the proposed marriage. In this conversation Juliet is referred to and described several times. She is said to be a “stranger in the world” and that she hasn’t seen ‘fourteen years’. These two quotes prompt the audience to think of Juliet as a dependant girl, without knowledge of the world or maturity. Then Capulet’s conversation leads the audience into thinking that Juliet is just a girl, not a woman. He even goes as far as to say that:”Too soon marred are those so early made”.This development of the character before she is met is a great scheming device, as before this conversation, Juliet’s character was like a blank canvas in the minds of the audience. Although, it is slightly harder for the audience of today, the viewers of this play in the 1500s would have known roughly what to expect, from a high society family like the Capulets. Obviously though Juliet is very different to what is early described by Capulet, amongst others. The small quote of Juliet by the Nurse:”If he be married, my grave is like to be my wedding bed,” is a quote that has great effect, it is one of the first glimpses we get of the ‘real Juliet’. The fact that she alone is talking about this boy, and completely forgotten Paris shows her own ability to take up an opinion. She has a mind that can think for its self.The disobedience of Juliet is pivotal to the plot of the play. It is also very significant in how the audience views the characters. The Capulets dialogue with Juliet is littered throughout the play. But, as the play goes on, the language used, deteriorates. When Capulet first mentions Juliet, it is of good hope and love for her: “Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she,”Lady Capulet then says in a conversation with Juliet and Nurse, that all is well with Juliet. In fact she wants her to become married.”Tell me daughter Juliet, how stands your dispositions to be married?”This quote being a question is influential. It shows that L.Capulet values the opinion of her daughter. She is not going to decide for her. Juliet replies to her mother in a similarly respectful way, saying that marriage is “an honour” and she could “dream not of”. Especially not without the help of her parents, as marriage was reserved for top citizens, such as Lady Capulet herself.The respectful conversation soon breaks down between Juliet and her parents. Capulet is the main culprit of this, as he seemingly loses all respect for the opinions or wishes of his daughter whilst saying to Juliet’s face that she is a “Mistress minion” that would – or will “proud him no prouds”. This extreme change in the relations of the Capulet family is triggered by Juliet’s disobedience. She persistently denies the chance of marriage to Paris, going against the wishes of her parents. The fact that she cannot provide a reason for her wish to not wed is of great concern to her parents. As this is interpreted by them as a lack of respect towards their opinion on Paris, and how Juliet should live. “How, how, how, how, chopt-logic. What is this?” All this conversation between Juliet and her parents is having the effect of disrespect towards Juliet. 1500s audiences would have seen Juliet as a troubled child, and although they can see why she must not marry Paris, respect to a parents decision was far greater a priority.The conversation between Capulet and Juliet soon worsens. The quote of “I am ever ruled by you” in 4:2 says to Capulet that Juliet has come to her senses and respected the decision made by him and L.Capulet to marry Paris. But the plot goes much further than that. Juliet manipulates her father into thinking that she is now going to marry Paris, having spoken to Friar Lawrence, when in fact she has plotted to fake her death just to be with someone else. The relationship has now completely broken down on Juliet’s side, stooping to bare faced lying so she can get her own way.Shakespeare builds up the structure of the play in such a way that it is almost dramatic. From the prologue, we are warned that the play takes “The fearful passage of their death-marked love.” But, as soon as the first scene opens, we are faced with humour. The whole incident between the servants to the two houses – about ‘bite my thumb’ – is comical. Making the opening few scenes of the play light hearted and relaxed, especially with the party. Parties are very much the opposite of a tragedy. As we progress through the play the plot thickens, and the light-hearted mood is broken.Shocking the audience with the murder of Mercutio and Tybalt in one scene is an effective device, as the tragedy is seen as even greater by the effect that the comedy had at the beginning. From happy and light hearted, especially having just seen the wedding of Romeo and Juliet, to what is now murder is quite a contrast. Romeo being banished is a painful realisation by the audience that not all goes well in love. And the final deaths of both Romeo and Juliet also deepen the impact on the audience and of the tragedy.The last speech by the Prince and the prologue compliment each other. They act as brackets to the play, both commenting similar views on what happened. These brackets remind the audience of how things went wrong for the “star-crossed lovers” and sort out the play in the audience’s minds.The stage direction of Juliet getting down on her knees before her parents is one of very few in the play. Going down onto knees before your elders was seen as a mark of respect and was practised throughout society. As the audience may be swinging in the direction of Capulet’s view (seeing Juliet as a “disobedient wretch”) the stage direction hesitates this. It shows to the audience that Juliet is not all bad. She may seem disobedient, but she has respect for her parents. It prompts the audience to see Juliet as a matured young woman who can make her own decisions in life.Overall the play offers a very unusual character in Juliet. Throughout the play we can see her rebelliousness to her parents in conversations, and the ambiguity she shows throughout these. This all adds to an effective play that was years ahead of its current audience, in terms of how characters act and behave around each other.

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Romeo and Juliet is a story about two “star-cross’d” lovers who fall in love instantly, then soon end their lives together after many dramatic feuds between the Capulets and Montagues. The play was written by William Shakespeare and published in 1597, it is only assumed it was written two years before this.The prologue has a purpose to quieten down the audience and capture their attention as to what the play will be about, without saying how.The play is about a feud between the Capulets and Montagues, and how two “star cross’d lovers take their lives” together after immediately falling in love at a Capulet ball. Romeo and Juliet tragically die after a series of unfortunate events controlled by the pair’s fate.At the beginning of the play there is a street brawl between the Capulets and Montagues. Two Capulets; Gregory and Sampson, talk of how they would react if there were a fight between the two enemies. Coincidently, two Montagues; Abraham and Balthasar, mistaken the Capulets for biting their thumbs at them. The fight gets out of control and many Capulets and Montagues become involved. Escalus, the Prince of Verona, puts an end to the fight. He makes the rules in the city. Such like his decree; “If ever you disturb our streets again, your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace”. This meaning if anyone starts another fight and disturbs the peace, they will pay with death. This is an important part of the play as we know something then follows from this and that someone does something wrong, as Romeo and Juliet both end up dead.Romeo and Benvolio find out about the Capulet feast after they meet a Capulet servant. Although he can’t read, he is told to invite guests from a written list. The servant asks Romeo to read aloud what each name says. He sees that Rosaline, the girl he is besotted with is attending. The Capulet then tells them it will be held at the Capulet house. Benvolio is trying to persuade Romeo to get over Rosaline by telling him to look for other attractive women. Romeo is na�ve and very sensitive, we see this in the film more easily than we do in the book as it shows him sat alone feeling sorry for himself.Romeo and Benvolio turn up at the ball wearing masks to hide their identities as they are not supposed to be seen as Montagues. Tybalt recognises Romeo, “This by his voice is a Montague, fetch me my rapier, boy,” and accuses him of making fun of their festivities by showing up in a strange mask. Tybalt then wants to throw Romeo out, saying how it would not be a sin to kill Romeo there and then. Lord Capulet tells Tybalt to leave him alone as he doesn’t want the night to be disturbed when Romeo has done no harm and behaves himself like a well mannered person from a good family.Lord Capulet then says that if Tybalt respects him he will not scowl, because bad behaviour is uncalled for in their night of celebration. “I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall, now seeming sweet, convert to bitterest gall” Tybalt is saying that he will endure Romeo’s presence but inside he is boiling with rage and mutters that his calm mood will soon develop into anger and hatred that he will seemingly act upon. Later on in the play, Tybalt tries to get revenge on Romeo, but ends up showing Mercutio who is best at fighting, which ends in a dramatic accident.Romeo doesn’t manage to see Rosaline as he is distracted the whole night by Juliet, daughter of Lord Capulet. The two instantly fall in love. “O she doth teach the torches to burn bright. It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear; beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear” – Romeo is stunned by Juliet’s beauty and says she stands out from the crowd.Romeo enters the church where Friar Lawrence is, and requests he conducts a marriage between him and Juliet. The Friar agrees, as he is in the same mind as Romeo, “In one respect I’ll thy assistant be, for this alliance may so happy prove, to turn your household’s rancour to pure love”, figuring it may bring the opposing families together. Though the Friar does feel he has more of a superior position, as his advice is needed by many; such as Romeo, the Nurse and Paris. Thus giving him some kind of advantage, to bring the two families together by a planned marriage. The Friar refers to Romeo proving how fickle men can be, as Romeo has suddenly forgotten Rosaline for another girl. The constant reference to Rosaline is a reminder of how different his love for Juliet is. The Friar states how Romeo was merely infatuated with Rosaline rather than in love.In Act 2 Scene 6, the wedding takes place between Romeo and Juliet, with only the Friar and Juliet’s Nurse as witnesses. Romeo is impatient and the Friar persuades him to be wait until Juliet arrives. We see from this again that Romeo rushes into things and is too fast for the rest of the world. Friar Lawrence expresses his concerns that the secret marriage between Romeo and Juliet may actually make things worse by saying; “These violent delights have violent ends, and in their triumph die, like fire and powder, which as they kiss consume” -The Friar is saying that extreme emotions such as Romeo’s love for Juliet often end violently. This also reminds us of the prologue and we can guess that the Friar is correct if the marriage is to go ahead. His fears are justified and in the very next scene, the essential scene in the play, what happens is affected by Romeo’s attitude and behaviour now that he is married to Juliet. “For by your leaves, you shall not stay alone, till holy church incorporate two in one.” – Friar Lawrence is saying that he is worried the pair may do something regretful before they are even married, so he says he will not leave them alone with each other until they are united in marriage.All of the events which have taken place in Acts 1 and 2 come to a climax in Act 3 Scene 1. Benvolio tries to persuade Mercutio to go some place else with him as the Capulets are around and he sees trouble ahead. Mercutio retaliates and says that Benvolio is as much a troublemaker as anyone else, and presumably makes up a list of reasons Benvolio has had to pick fights with people. From the readers point of view, Benvolio is actually a good friend. He wants to do the right thing and is intimidated easily by others; some would refer to him as ‘the peacemaker’.The person Tybalt is looking for is Romeo, who then arrives straight from his wedding. “Romeo, the love I bear thee can afford. No better term than this – thou art a villain” – Tybalt is saying that the term villain is the only way to describe Romeo. Romeo refuses in a pleasant way as he is reluctant to fight now that they are family. Romeo is saying he has a reason to love Tybalt, and that he will put aside his rage and ignore the insulting name that he denies. After Tybalt accuses Romeo of harming him, Romeo replies “I do protest I never injured thee, but love thee better than thou canst devise..”. Romeo is saying that he never harmed Tybalt, and that Tybalt wont ever understand Romeo’s love until he knows the reason.Mercutio accepts Tybalt’s challenge on Romeo’s behalf. Romeo attempts to stop them after saying “Gentleman, for shame, forbear this outrage Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath forbid this bandying in Verona streets..” Romeo pleads them to stop as he reminds them of the Prince’s decree, to forbid fighting in the streets of Verona. Tybalt stabs Mercutio, without meaning to cause such a fatal injury. Mercutio’s death immediately puts an end to the Friar’s plan to unite the two families. After this incident, we see that Romeo admits, love makes him weak. “O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate, and in my temper softened valor’s steel!”.Once Tybalt returns, Romeo is angry that he has killed a good man and says it’s time for rage to guide his actions. Romeo is drawn into the fight much against his will, his marriage to Juliet has triggered a desire to avoid being called a coward. “Now, Tybalt, take the “villain” back again that late thou gavest me, for Mercutio’s soul is but a little way above our heads, Staying for thine to keep him company. Either thou or I, or both, must go with him.” Romeo says that either Tybalt, Romeo or both of them have to join Mercutio.Tybalt says that he is Romeo’s friend, and that Romeo shall go to heaven with him. “This shall determine that” – Are the last words Romeo says before he revengefully kills Tybalt. Romeo escapes from the scene just before the Prince arrives. As he does, Benvolio explains the whole story. Whilst Lady Montague accuses him of lying, the Prince decides that Romeo will be banished, and if he is seen in Verona he will be killed. “Immediately we do exile him hence”. The Prince is retreating from his previous speech about punishment for “civil brawls”, but the sentence of banishment on Romeo leaves possibility for a happy ending.The 4 male characters who take part in Act 3 Scene 1 are all different from each other. Benvolio and Romeo try to act as peacemakers but Mercutio and Tybalt are “hotheads” always ready to fight. “We talk here in the public haunt of men. Either withdraw into some private place, and reason coldly of your grievances, or else depart..” – Benvolio is saying everybody can see them as they are causing a disturbance to the public, he is worried they will get into trouble if they are seen so tries to convince the men to stop fighting. We can see that he is reluctant and intimidated by others easily. Benvolio doesn’t want to get into trouble, as he reminds them they are in the eye of the public.”Draw Benvolio beat down their weapons. Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage. Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath forbid this bandying in Verona streets. Hold Tybalt. Good Mercutio” – Romeo also warns them of the Prince’s decree and urges them to stop fighting. Though if Romeo hadn’t have appeared at the ball, there wouldn’t be a reason for their deaths. The fight is also to blame for the action that follows in Acts 4 and 5.The prologue states that fate is against Romeo and Juliet, their love is “death-marked,” and they have no control over what happens, they are just misfortunate that the ending of the play is so tragic. Every event up to Act 3 scene 1 brought Romeo and Juliet closer to their fates. In the prologue, they are also referred to as “star-cross’d lovers” meaning they won’t live happily ever after.Although fate ends their lives it also brings the couple together; they were a perfect match but unfortunately for them both they were from feuding families. The odd that one belonged to Montague and the other to Capulet was very slim. If the pair hadn’t met in the first place, their lives wouldn’t have ended. Supposedly, if Rosline had been at the ball and had returned Romeo’s affection, then all the future suffering between him and Juliet wouldn’t have occurred. A twist of luck ended in Romeo falling for a completely different girl, Juliet. “My mind misgives someconsequence, yet hanging in the stars, shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this night’s revels” Romeo feels that going to this ball will trigger unwanted business, that will result in his death. He ignores his premonition as he decides it is not in his hands and carries on with the plan. When insisting on marrying Juliet straight away, the friar warns Romeo that people who rush often have very destructive consequences. This reminds us that Romeo’s fate is unavoidable.Fate is responsible for other deaths in the play, as Mercutio and Tybalt are killed beforehand. Romeo happens to hold morals of a loving gentleman and Mercutio’s behaviour is fuelled by this, leading to his own death. Romeo cries “I am Fortune’s fool” after he has killed Tybalt, admitting he has bad luck. After the deaths of Mercutio and Tybalt, fate controls the way Romeo and Juliet’s lives are tragically brought to an end. A seemingly perfect plan is thought of by Friar Lawrence, that Juliet would take a potion to make her appear dead on the day of her wedding.Romeo was to be informed about the plan by sending a letter to where he had been banished. Fate prevents this from working as there was a quarantine and Romeo is unable to receive the letter. Ironically Romeo and Juliet both have premonitions of each other’s death. Juliet warns Romeo before he leaves to Mantua “as one dead in the bottom of a tomb. Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale”. This is worrying as the last premonition was in fact true. Once Friar Lawrence’s plan falls through, Balthasar as expected, mistakes Juliet for being dead and cautiously reports it to Romeo, despite his dislike to being the bearer of bad news.Both the films of Romeo & Juliet are different from eachother. They share similarities, though Zeffirelli and Luhrmann decided to film a large majority of the film differently. Different times in life and outlook of the play affect the style of how the film is put together by two different people.Both versions include the original prologue, but Zeffirelli’s version uses a narrator to speak it whereas the modern version presents it as a newscast. During the first fight, the films both incorporate light and darkness into the clothes of the two families, the older version represents Montagues by dressing them in darker colours. On the other hand they are wearing lighter colours in Luhrmann’s version. Luhrmann also sets the whole of the first fight at a local gas station beginning and ending with the same people. Zeffirelli starts the fight in the town market with just two Montagues and two Capulets, taking it to the town centre where many others become involved.The rivalry between the two families is more noticeable in the modern version as the two families are verbally fighting before physical action takes place. Zeffirelli starts the fight between the two families as almost friendly joking but then it becomes serious. We see them to be more civil compared to the modern version. Luhrmann’s version therefore appears more exaggerated when showing anger and opposition and Zeffirelli makes his film more traditional, keeping to the original script and using less violence than the modern film.Luhrmann’s version uses more modern weapons, replacing swords with guns and portraying the families much more like gangs by showing them in modern clothes and colours. On the other hand, the actors in the older edition wear traditional clothing of the period in which the play is set. Tragedy is a key factor in Romeo & Juliet, both films include it but in a different style. Action in Luhrmann’s version always seems to suggest people will die tragically, making it appear more obvious. Differently, the audience of Zeffirelli’s film will receive more of a surprise to see that fighting is almost playful but still ends up in some form of disaster.In my opinion the older film is more my style as it is more traditional and to a authentic and realistic style, whereas the modern film is at some points farfetched and exaggerates the storyline of the original script. Although having said this, typically, I understand the modern version more and I find it more engaging and interesting than Zeffirelli’s reproduction. I found that I noticed the characters more by their personas and learnt the moral of the story quicker than I would’ve done watching the older version initially.Act 3 Scene 1 is a turning point in the play because the events of Acts 1 & 2 comes to a climax in this scene. This scene involves the death of both Mercutio and Tybalt, as well as Romeo’s change of heart. Before Mercutio’s death, Romeo doesn’t want to fight, and is a caring person who wants peace now that he is married to a Capulet. His behaviour and fortune changes in this scene because of the death of Mercutio. There is no longer hope for change or peace, as we are reminded of the prologue and the punishment for fighting in the streets of Verona.After Tybalt’s death, Romeo is sent away to a place far from Juliet, which is the opposite of what he wants. The Friar needn’t have to had thought of a plan to re-unite the lovers if the events in Act 3 Scene 1 hadn’t occurred because there would be no reason for Romeo to have been separated from Juliet. Thus would have more than likely prevented the deaths of them both.

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Romeo and Juliet is a story about two “star-cross’d” lovers who fall in love instantly, then soon end their lives together after many dramatic feuds between the Capulets and Montagues. The play was written by William Shakespeare and published in 1597, it is only assumed it was written two years before this.The prologue has a purpose to quieten down the audience and capture their attention as to what the play will be about, without saying how.The play is about a feud between the Capulets and Montagues, and how two “star cross’d lovers take their lives” together after immediately falling in love at a Capulet ball. Romeo and Juliet tragically die after a series of unfortunate events controlled by the pair’s fate.At the beginning of the play there is a street brawl between the Capulets and Montagues. Two Capulets; Gregory and Sampson, talk of how they would react if there were a fight between the two enemies. Coincidently, two Montagues; Abraham and Balthasar, mistaken the Capulets for biting their thumbs at them. The fight gets out of control and many Capulets and Montagues become involved. Escalus, the Prince of Verona, puts an end to the fight. He makes the rules in the city. Such like his decree; “If ever you disturb our streets again, your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace”. This meaning if anyone starts another fight and disturbs the peace, they will pay with death. This is an important part of the play as we know something then follows from this and that someone does something wrong, as Romeo and Juliet both end up dead.Romeo and Benvolio find out about the Capulet feast after they meet a Capulet servant. Although he can’t read, he is told to invite guests from a written list. The servant asks Romeo to read aloud what each name says. He sees that Rosaline, the girl he is besotted with is attending. The Capulet then tells them it will be held at the Capulet house. Benvolio is trying to persuade Romeo to get over Rosaline by telling him to look for other attractive women. Romeo is na�ve and very sensitive, we see this in the film more easily than we do in the book as it shows him sat alone feeling sorry for himself.Romeo and Benvolio turn up at the ball wearing masks to hide their identities as they are not supposed to be seen as Montagues. Tybalt recognises Romeo, “This by his voice is a Montague, fetch me my rapier, boy,” and accuses him of making fun of their festivities by showing up in a strange mask. Tybalt then wants to throw Romeo out, saying how it would not be a sin to kill Romeo there and then. Lord Capulet tells Tybalt to leave him alone as he doesn’t want the night to be disturbed when Romeo has done no harm and behaves himself like a well mannered person from a good family.Lord Capulet then says that if Tybalt respects him he will not scowl, because bad behaviour is uncalled for in their night of celebration. “I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall, now seeming sweet, convert to bitterest gall” Tybalt is saying that he will endure Romeo’s presence but inside he is boiling with rage and mutters that his calm mood will soon develop into anger and hatred that he will seemingly act upon. Later on in the play, Tybalt tries to get revenge on Romeo, but ends up showing Mercutio who is best at fighting, which ends in a dramatic accident.Romeo doesn’t manage to see Rosaline as he is distracted the whole night by Juliet, daughter of Lord Capulet. The two instantly fall in love. “O she doth teach the torches to burn bright. It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear; beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear” – Romeo is stunned by Juliet’s beauty and says she stands out from the crowd.Romeo enters the church where Friar Lawrence is, and requests he conducts a marriage between him and Juliet. The Friar agrees, as he is in the same mind as Romeo, “In one respect I’ll thy assistant be, for this alliance may so happy prove, to turn your household’s rancour to pure love”, figuring it may bring the opposing families together. Though the Friar does feel he has more of a superior position, as his advice is needed by many; such as Romeo, the Nurse and Paris. Thus giving him some kind of advantage, to bring the two families together by a planned marriage. The Friar refers to Romeo proving how fickle men can be, as Romeo has suddenly forgotten Rosaline for another girl. The constant reference to Rosaline is a reminder of how different his love for Juliet is. The Friar states how Romeo was merely infatuated with Rosaline rather than in love.In Act 2 Scene 6, the wedding takes place between Romeo and Juliet, with only the Friar and Juliet’s Nurse as witnesses. Romeo is impatient and the Friar persuades him to be wait until Juliet arrives. We see from this again that Romeo rushes into things and is too fast for the rest of the world. Friar Lawrence expresses his concerns that the secret marriage between Romeo and Juliet may actually make things worse by saying; “These violent delights have violent ends, and in their triumph die, like fire and powder, which as they kiss consume” – The Friar is saying that extreme emotions such as Romeo’s love for Juliet often end violently.This also reminds us of the prologue and we can guess that the Friar is correct if the marriage is to go ahead. His fears are justified and in the very next scene, the essential scene in the play, what happens is affected by Romeo’s attitude and behaviour now that he is married to Juliet. “For by your leaves, you shall not stay alone, till holy church incorporate two in one.” – Friar Lawrence is saying that he is worried the pair may do something regretful before they are even married, so he says he will not leave them alone with each other until they are united in marriage.All of the events which have taken place in Acts 1 and 2 come to a climax in Act 3 Scene 1. Benvolio tries to persuade Mercutio to go some place else with him as the Capulets are around and he sees trouble ahead. Mercutio retaliates and says that Benvolio is as much a troublemaker as anyone else, and presumably makes up a list of reasons Benvolio has had to pick fights with people. From the readers point of view, Benvolio is actually a good friend. He wants to do the right thing and is intimidated easily by others; some would refer to him as ‘the peacemaker’.The person Tybalt is looking for is Romeo, who then arrives straight from his wedding. “Romeo, the love I bear thee can afford. No better term than this – thou art a villain” – Tybalt is saying that the term villain is the only way to describe Romeo. Romeo refuses in a pleasant way as he is reluctant to fight now that they are family. Romeo is saying he has a reason to love Tybalt, and that he will put aside his rage and ignore the insulting name that he denies. After Tybalt accuses Romeo of harming him, Romeo replies “I do protest I never injured thee, but love thee better than thou canst devise..”.Romeo is saying that he never harmed Tybalt, and that Tybalt wont ever understand Romeo’s love until he knows the reason. Mercutio accepts Tybalt’s challenge on Romeo’s behalf. Romeo attempts to stop them after saying “Gentleman, for shame, forbear this outrage Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath forbid this bandying in Verona streets..” Romeo pleads them to stop as he reminds them of the Prince’s decree, to forbid fighting in the streets of Verona. Tybalt stabs Mercutio, without meaning to cause such a fatal injury. Mercutio’s death immediately puts an end to the Friar’s plan to unite the two families. After this incident, we see that Romeo admits, love makes him weak. “O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate, and in my temper softened valor’s steel!”.Once Tybalt returns, Romeo is angry that he has killed a good man and says it’s time for rage to guide his actions. Romeo is drawn into the fight much against his will, his marriage to Juliet has triggered a desire to avoid being called a coward. “Now, Tybalt, take the “villain” back again that late thou gavest me, for Mercutio’s soul is but a little way above our heads, Staying for thine to keep him company. Either thou or I, or both, must go with him.” Romeo says that either Tybalt, Romeo or both of them have to join Mercutio. Tybalt says that he is Romeo’s friend, and that Romeo shall go to heaven with him.”This shall determine that” – Are the last words Romeo says before he revengefully kills Tybalt. Romeo escapes from the scene just before the Prince arrives. As he does, Benvolio explains the whole story. Whilst Lady Montague accuses him of lying, the Prince decides that Romeo will be banished, and if he is seen in Verona he will be killed. “Immediately we do exile him hence”. The Prince is retreating from his previous speech about punishment for “civil brawls”, but the sentence of banishment on Romeo leaves possibility for a happy ending.The 4 male characters who take part in Act 3 Scene 1 are all different from each other. Benvolio and Romeo try to act as peacemakers but Mercutio and Tybalt are “hotheads” always ready to fight. “We talk here in the public haunt of men. Either withdraw into some private place, and reason coldly of your grievances, or else depart..” – Benvolio is saying everybody can see them as they are causing a disturbance to the public, he is worried they will get into trouble if they are seen so tries to convince the men to stop fighting.We can see that he is reluctant and intimidated by others easily. Benvolio doesn’t want to get into trouble, as he reminds them they are in the eye of the public. “Draw Benvolio beat down their weapons. Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage. Tybalt, Mercutio, the Prince expressly hath forbid this bandying in Verona streets. Hold Tybalt. Good Mercutio” – Romeo also warns them of the Prince’s decree and urges them to stop fighting. Though if Romeo hadn’t have appeared at the ball, there wouldn’t be a reason for their deaths. The fight is also to blame for the action that follows in Acts 4 and 5.The prologue states that fate is against Romeo and Juliet, their love is “death-marked,” and they have no control over what happens, they are just misfortunate that the ending of the play is so tragic. Every event up to Act 3 scene 1 brought Romeo and Juliet closer to their fates. In the prologue, they are also referred to as “star-cross’d lovers” meaning they won’t live happily ever after. Although fate ends their lives it also brings the couple together; they were a perfect match but unfortunately for them both they were from feuding families.The odd that one belonged to Montague and the other to Capulet was very slim. If the pair hadn’t met in the first place, their lives wouldn’t have ended. Supposedly, if Rosline had been at the ball and had returned Romeo’s affection, then all the future suffering between him and Juliet wouldn’t have occurred. A twist of luck ended in Romeo falling for a completely different girl, Juliet. “My mind misgives someconsequence, yet hanging in the stars, shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this night’s revels” Romeo feels that going to this ball will trigger unwanted business, that will result in his death. He ignores his premonition as he decides it is not in his hands and carries on with the plan. When insisting on marrying Juliet straight away, the friar warns Romeo that people who rush often have very destructive consequences. This reminds us that Romeo’s fate is unavoidable. Fate is responsible for other deaths in the play, as Mercutio and Tybalt are killed beforehand. Romeo happens to hold morals of a loving gentleman and Mercutio’s behaviour is fuelled by this, leading to his own death. Romeo cries “I am Fortune’s fool” after he has killed Tybalt, admitting he has bad luck. After the deaths of Mercutio and Tybalt, fate controls the way Romeo and Juliet’s lives are tragically brought to an end.A seemingly perfect plan is thought of by Friar Lawrence, that Juliet would take a potion to make her appear dead on the day of her wedding. Romeo was to be informed about the plan by sending a letter to where he had been banished. Fate prevents this from working as there was a quarantine and Romeo is unable to receive the letter. Ironically Romeo and Juliet both have premonitions of each other’s death. Juliet warns Romeo before he leaves to Mantua “as one dead in the bottom of a tomb. Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale”. This is worrying as the last premonition was in fact true. Once Friar Lawrence’s plan falls through, Balthasar as expected, mistakes Juliet for being dead and cautiously reports it to Romeo, despite his dislike to being the bearer of bad news.Both the films of Romeo & Juliet are different from eachother. They share similarities, though Zeffirelli and Luhrmann decided to film a large majority of the film differently. Different times in life and outlook of the play affect the style of how the film is put together by two different people.Both versions include the original prologue, but Zeffirelli’s version uses a narrator to speak it whereas the modern version presents it as a newscast. During the first fight, the films both incorporate light and darkness into the clothes of the two families, the older version represents Montagues by dressing them in darker colours. On the other hand they are wearing lighter colours in Luhrmann’s version. Luhrmann also sets the whole of the first fight at a local gas station beginning and ending with the same people. Zeffirelli starts the fight in the town market with just two Montagues and two Capulets, taking it to the town centre where many others become involved.The rivalry between the two families is more noticeable in the modern version as the two families are verbally fighting before physical action takes place. Zeffirelli starts the fight between the two families as almost friendly joking but then it becomes serious. We see them to be more civil compared to the modern version. Luhrmann’s version therefore appears more exaggerated when showing anger and opposition and Zeffirelli makes his film more traditional, keeping to the original script and using less violence than the modern film. Luhrmann’s version uses more modern weapons, replacing swords with guns and portraying the families much more like gangs by showing them in modern clothes and colours.On the other hand, the actors in the older edition wear traditional clothing of the period in which the play is set. Tragedy is a key factor in Romeo & Juliet, both films include it but in a different style. Action in Luhrmann’s version always seems to suggest people will die tragically, making it appear more obvious. Differently, the audience of Zeffirelli’s film will receive more of a surprise to see that fighting is almost playful but still ends up in some form of disaster.In my opinion the older film is more my style as it is more traditional and to a authentic and realistic style, whereas the modern film is at some points farfetched and exaggerates the storyline of the original script. Although having said this, typically, I understand the modern version more and I find it more engaging and interesting than Zeffirelli’s reproduction. I found that I noticed the characters more by their personas and learnt the moral of the story quicker than I would’ve done watching the older version initially.Act 3 Scene 1 is a turning point in the play because the events of Acts 1 & 2 comes to a climax in this scene. This scene involves the death of both Mercutio and Tybalt, as well as Romeo’s change of heart. Before Mercutio’s death, Romeo doesn’t want to fight, and is a caring person who wants peace now that he is married to a Capulet. His behaviour and fortune changes in this scene because of the death of Mercutio. There is no longer hope for change or peace, as we are reminded of the prologue and the punishment for fighting in the streets of Verona.After Tybalt’s death, Romeo is sent away to a place far from Juliet, which is the opposite of what he wants. The Friar needn’t have to had thought of a plan to re-unite the lovers if the events in Act 3 Scene 1 hadn’t occurred because there would be no reason for Romeo to have been separated from Juliet. Thus would have more than likely prevented the deaths of them both.

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